Mwanza

Tanzania’s second-largest city, and the lake region’s economic heart, Mwanza is set on Lake Victoria’s shore, surrounded by hills strewn with enormous boulders. It is notable for its strong Indian influences, as well as for being a major industrial centre and a busy port. Yet despite its rapidly rising skyline, Mwanza manages to retain a casual feel.

In addition to being a stop on the way to Rubondo Island National Park, Mwanza is a great starting or finishing point for safaris through Ngorongoro and the Serengeti, ideally as a loop by adding in Lake Natron.

Kigoma

This agreeable little town is the regional capital and only large Tanzanian port on Lake Tanganyika. It’s also the end of the line for the Central Line train and a starting point for the MV Liemba and visits to Gombe National Park. It’s hardly a bustling metropolis, but it feels that way if you’ve spent any time in other parts of western Tanzania.

Bukoba

Bustling, green-leafed Bukoba has an attractive waterside setting and a pleasing small-town feel. Everyone who comes to visit here seems to like it, even though it’s a little hard to put your finger on exactly why. The town traces its roots to 1890, when Emin Pasha (Eduard Schnitzer), a German doctor and inveterate wanderer, arrived on the western shores of Lake Victoria as part of efforts to establish a German foothold in the region. Since then, the second-largest port on the Tanzanian lakeshore has quietly prospered, thanks to the income generated by coffee, tea and vanilla farming.

Lake Victoria

This lake found on the border between Tanzania, Kenya & Uganda is the largest   lake in Africa & the second largest fresh water lake in the world. Lake Victoria is also the source of River Nile, this fact surprisingly eluded the 19th century explorers.

Lake Tanganyika

The waters of Lake Tanganyika, the longest & second deepest freshwater lake in the world contains the richest concentration of fish found anywhere( about 250 species) are found here.

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